SpelHouse Pride Week 2014

  In 2010, Morehouse College Safe Space (MCSS) organized and made history with the celebration of its very first P.R.I.D.E (Progress, Restoration, Identity, Dignity and Empowerment) Week. Students of the GBT community/Queer diaspora were given a voice and space to affirm their identities and the opportunity to take PRIDE in who they are as a people holistically. Campus saw a variety of events including various (LGBT) movie screenings, HIV testing, an Equality Ball, the return of LGBT Christian organization Soulforce's Equality Ride, a panel discussion featuring B. Scott and campus-wide meetings about sexuality, diversity, and gender expression. In the same spirit, Spelman's Afrekete has also organized pride weeks and numerous events on their campus as well. In 2009, they dedicated their first annual pride week as a radical response to Morehouse's New Appropriate Attire Policy; The theme of week was "A House Divided Cannot Stand." One of the most popular events to date—which closed the week and gained lots of support—was The Appropriate Dress Attire WERK Fashion Show co-sponsored with MCSS. The show interrogated normative notions of gender expression while fiercely pushing back against gender policing present in the Atlanta University Center featuring students in—and out of—drag, poetry, music, and lots of fun. Following in the footsteps of both organizations'  fierce predecessors Je-Shawna C. Wholley, Michael Brewer, Daniel Edwards, and Kevin Webb, the theme/focus of the week was: "We Are Coming Home: Claiming Space, Redefining It, & Celebrating Wholeness." The goals for the celebratory week were to be quite intentional and bold, but simple: to celebrate the fearless, creative, and resilient spirits of LGBTQ folks of color; to promote community and alliance building amongst our student body; and to celebrate, affirm, and take pride in our identities—culturally, spiritually, and holistically.

 

In 2010, Morehouse College Safe Space (MCSS) organized and made history with the celebration of its very first P.R.I.D.E (Progress, Restoration, Identity, Dignity and Empowerment) Week. Students of the GBT community/Queer diaspora were given a voice and space to affirm their identities and the opportunity to take PRIDE in who they are as a people holistically. Campus saw a variety of events including various (LGBT) movie screenings, HIV testing, an Equality Ball, the return of LGBT Christian organization Soulforce's Equality Ride, a panel discussion featuring B. Scott and campus-wide meetings about sexuality, diversity, and gender expression. In the same spirit, Spelman's Afrekete has also organized pride weeks and numerous events on their campus as well. In 2009, they dedicated their first annual pride week as a radical response to Morehouse's New Appropriate Attire Policy; The theme of week was "A House Divided Cannot Stand." One of the most popular events to date—which closed the week and gained lots of support—was The Appropriate Dress Attire WERK Fashion Show co-sponsored with MCSS. The show interrogated normative notions of gender expression while fiercely pushing back against gender policing present in the Atlanta University Center featuring students in—and out of—drag, poetry, music, and lots of fun.

Following in the footsteps of both organizations'  fierce predecessors Je-Shawna C. Wholley, Michael Brewer, Daniel Edwards, and Kevin Webb, the theme/focus of the week was: "We Are Coming Home: Claiming Space, Redefining It, & Celebrating Wholeness." 
The goals for the celebratory week were to be quite intentional and bold, but simple: to celebrate the fearless, creative, and resilient spirits of LGBTQ folks of color; to promote community and alliance building amongst our student body; and to celebrate, affirm, and take pride in our identities—culturally, spiritually, and holistically.

Friend of Essex Atlanta Screening 

  Morehouse College Safe Space in association with Nu Nation Productions organized a fabulous and transformational screening of Amir Dixon's debut film, "Friend of Essex." The event saw over 200 attendees and concluded with a thoughtful and empowering panel discussion of the themes and topics explored in the film.  Friend of Essex is a mix of one-on-one interviews, group interviews, narrative pieces and poetry inspired by Essex Hemphill’s writing and the 1989 film Tongues Untied by Marlon Riggs. A piece in the film entitled,“Dear White Jesus” explores religious homophobia in the Black church and its direct connections to racism. Two central pieces of Friend of Essex are the importance of community among young black gay men and the HIV epidemic, of which young Black gay men are at the epicenter.

 

Morehouse College Safe Space in association with Nu Nation Productions organized a fabulous and transformational screening of Amir Dixon's debut film, "Friend of Essex." The event saw over 200 attendees and concluded with a thoughtful and empowering panel discussion of the themes and topics explored in the film. 

Friend of Essex is a mix of one-on-one interviews, group interviews, narrative pieces and poetry inspired by Essex Hemphill’s writing and the 1989 film Tongues Untied by Marlon Riggs. A piece in the film entitled,“Dear White Jesus” explores religious homophobia in the Black church and its direct connections to racism. Two central pieces of Friend of Essex are the importance of community among young black gay men and the HIV epidemic, of which young Black gay men are at the epicenter.